(NSFW) Are Virtual 3D Anime Girls Taking Jobs From Real People?

On the lewder side of the internet, a new camgirl is making the rounds and strangely enough, it’s other camgirls that are making a fuss.

Melody is a 3D animated camgirl that uses the advancements of live animation to make weebs finally live out their fantasies of talking to their “hot anime waifu” live. She was designed by Digitrevx, who also designed famous V-Tuber Mirai Akemi. Much like her safe for work “sisters” Melody is made possible through the use of the Unity engine and next-gen motion capture.

Of course, it’s not all just tech that makes Melody unique. Whoever is lending her a voice and personality has been doing a bangup job staying in character.

In response to a question asking her reasons for deciding to be a camgirl, Melody says:

“I think there’s a higher demand for the odd and the fantastical,” she says. “With art, it’s flexible, you’re allowed to explore your sexuality. And with real titties? No offense, but it’s bound to the cruel weight of science, gravity, and bones that only go one way.”

The thing a lot of IRL camgirls seem to be taking issue with is that Melody should be on a separate site from the “flesh and blood” streamers. According to a camgirl by the name of May, it would be unfair to the actual streamers who are at risk of getting stalked or harassed because unlike Melody, they aren’t “avatars”. She seems to have a fair point, because Melody had an astonishingly succesful debut, rising to the top of Chaturbate.

Melody, in a surprisingly succinct response, had this to say:

“It makes me sad that [other models] don’t want me there. I don’t agree with the argument that because I’m safer, and less likely to have stalkers, that I shouldn’t be allowed to stream…I don’t think camming is defined by the risk models take in their personal lives, I think it’s defined by the content that they produce, and the community they build around themselves. I think it’s a dangerous precedent to tell future cam models that you are somehow less deserving of being a model, unless you’re putting yourself at risk.”

That brings about a fascinating debate about the issue of automation in general. What is more unfair; Having real people who risk their lives for their job be suddenly replaced by a machine, or to boycott a machine that can do a risky job without harming any real person?

Melody makes a good point about how camgirls shouldn’t enter into a such a career with the idea that you can only be succesful if you’re in danger of being harassed.

It’s true that much like any profession, it’s the output itself that should be judged, not the method. If the output is good, then the method can be whatever you wanted (legally, of course).

On the other hand, I can understand the sentiment of IRL streamers that perhaps a site that has been focused on IRL women shouldn’t be forced to compete with a whole new medium altogether.

In my honest opinion, they should probably keep Melody on the site but under a different genre. I don’t believe Melody is “taking any jobs” as much as she is fulfilling a specific niche that hadn’t existed before on the site. Not everybody on the site is there for anime girls, and the spike in popularity is similar to Kizuna Ai’s first foray into YouTube.

Real vloggers still exist despite Kizuna’s existence, so I have no doubt Melody’s eventually going to be a normal part of the camgirl cinematic universe.

By all accounts though, she’s been acting pretty much like any other camgirl, only in a virtual space. I’m honestly excited just how many niche platforms V-tubers can explore in the future because it always sparks a lot of fascinating debate.

In any case, our advancements in “not-needing-actual-humans-for-emotional-fulfillment” technology is getting better by the day, and I for one am excited(?) to see just how far we can run with it before ending humanity.

Oh THAT’S why Melody looks like Motoko Kusanagi.